Monday, September 5, 2011

Convention on Cluster Munitions - 2MSP in Beirut, Lebanon, 12-16 September 2011 

image

The Second Meeting of the States Parties (2MSP) of the Convention on Cluster Munitions (2MSP CCM) will take place in Beirut, following a programme of work concentrating on the key objectives of the Convention.

The GICHD will attend, providing technical input on a number of issues. These will include Land Release in the context of Cluster Munitions, guidance on reporting for the Convention using IMSMA  and outlining the GICHD Cluster Munition Identification Tool, which is  being developed to assist States identify which ammunition is included in the Convention.

Exciting huh?

Friday, September 2, 2011

QWIDS

These days, my task at the ISU relates to making use of the OECD DAC Database (http://stats.oecd.org/qwids/) to dig deeper as concerns a presentation that Kerry delivered at the Albanian Cooperation and Assistance Symposium on 31 May

From this database, I was able to obtain big numbers associated with the investments made by the OECD DAC Members which are States Parties that are responsible for helping other States Parties with significant numbers of survivors for five “detailed sector codes”: basic health care, basic health infrastructure, health personnel development, medical education and training, and medical services, from 2005 to 2009

 What I have to do now is find out what exactly have States Parties that are OECD DAC Members invested in with respect to basic health care, basic health infrastructure, health personnel development, medical education and training, and, medical services in States that are responsible for a significant number of landmine survivors? Who has provided what, when, specifically for what through / to whom?

As a starting point I have use one detailed sector code for one affected State Party (perhaps starting with Cambodia, followed by Ethiopia, Mozambique and Uganda) and compiled an inventory of what each State Party that is an OECD DAC Member has done in 2005.  The next step will be to do the same for 206-2009.  With this Query Wizard I am able to get a table that represents everything that all of the donors in question have spent in the affected country in question for matters related to the detailed sector code in question in each year from 2005 to 2009. Each entry in the table should link to additional information regarding what the investment represents. This additional Information may be slim. However, it could be used as a starting point to pursue complementary information from the relevant aid agency’s web site.

Anyhow, this is what I will be doing for the next couple of weeks.  I just thought it would be interesting to share what type of work I’m doing. 

Thursday, September 1, 2011
The benefits of being a GICHD JPO, 25 August 2011,  Geneva | Picture taken by Sharmala Naidoo

The benefits of being a GICHD JPO, 25 August 2011, Geneva | Picture taken by Sharmala Naidoo

What will happen at the 11MSP?
The 11MSP will feature plenary sessions from 09:00 to 12:00 and from  14:00 to 17:00 each day from 28 November to 2 December. His Excellency  Prak Sokhonn, Minister Attached to the Prime Minister and Vice-President  of the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority, has been  designated President of 11MSP.
What will happen at the 11MSP?

The 11MSP will feature plenary sessions from 09:00 to 12:00 and from 14:00 to 17:00 each day from 28 November to 2 December. His Excellency Prak Sokhonn, Minister Attached to the Prime Minister and Vice-President of the Cambodian Mine Action and Victim Assistance Authority, has been designated President of 11MSP.

What is the 11MSP and why is it important?
The 11MSP is a formal meeting of the 156 States which have accepted  the 1997 Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling,  Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their  Destruction. It is being held in accordance with Article 11 of the  Convention and pursuant to the decisions of the 2009 Second Review  Conference and the 2010 Tenth Meeting of the States Parties (10MSP).
The 11MSP is particularly significant because the Convention is  returning to a place where it all started two decades ago. As such, the  11MSP is a chance for the international community to recall how far the  world has come in pursuing a comprehensive end to the suffering and  casualties caused by anti-personnel mines.
The 11MSP, taking place in what remains one of the most mine affected  countries in the world, is also a chance to show the world that this  very much is an issue we still live with today. The11MSP can be a  springboard to further action and an opportunity to state that the  commitment to this cause will not end until the task is complete.
What is the 11MSP and why is it important?

The 11MSP is a formal meeting of the 156 States which have accepted the 1997 Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction. It is being held in accordance with Article 11 of the Convention and pursuant to the decisions of the 2009 Second Review Conference and the 2010 Tenth Meeting of the States Parties (10MSP).

The 11MSP is particularly significant because the Convention is returning to a place where it all started two decades ago. As such, the 11MSP is a chance for the international community to recall how far the world has come in pursuing a comprehensive end to the suffering and casualties caused by anti-personnel mines.

The 11MSP, taking place in what remains one of the most mine affected countries in the world, is also a chance to show the world that this very much is an issue we still live with today. The11MSP can be a springboard to further action and an opportunity to state that the commitment to this cause will not end until the task is complete.

From 3 August, His Royal Highness Prince Mired Raad Al Hussein of Jordan  in his capacity of Special Envoy on the Universalization of the  Convention, met with the Governor General of Tuvalu Sir Lakoba Taeia  Italeli as well as with Tuvalu’s Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign  Affairs.

From 3 August, His Royal Highness Prince Mired Raad Al Hussein of Jordan in his capacity of Special Envoy on the Universalization of the Convention, met with the Governor General of Tuvalu Sir Lakoba Taeia Italeli as well as with Tuvalu’s Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Global movement to eradicate landmines poised to be strengthened thanks to commitments made in the South Pacific


Suva, Fiji, 5 August 2011 – The global movement to eradicate anti-personnel landmines welcomes the news that the island nation of Tuvalu could join the international ban on these brutal and indiscriminate weapons in coming months. “I am pleased that the Government of Tuvalu is seriously considering joining the Mine Ban Convention,” said His Royal Highness Prince Mired Raad Al-Hussein of Jordan, who visited the country from 2 to 4 August.

Possible advances in the universalization of the landmark Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, or Ottawa Convention, were the main results of a high-level mission to the island nations of Tuvalu and Fiji by Prince Mired, who is currently serving as Special Envoy on the Universalization of the Convention.

“This Convention is about all States – big and small, rich and poor – raising their voices in support of an end to the suffering and casualties caused by anti-personnel mines. Tuvalu would give the anti-landmines movement a real boost if it became the next State to join this noble effort.”
Prince Mired’s visit to Tuvalu included meetings with Governor General Sir Lakoba Taeia Italeli, Prime Minister Willy Telavi, and, Minister of Foreign Affairs Apisai Lelemia.

Tuvalu participated for the first time in the work of the Convention in June 2011 in Geneva as an observer. “The international community again looks forward to the participation of Tuvalu, this time as a member of the Convention, at the Eleventh Meeting of the States Parties (11MSP) to take place in Phnom Penh, Cambodia from 28 November to 2 December 2011,” said Prince Mired.
During his mission to the South Pacific, Prince Mired also called upon the Secretary-General of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) Secretariat, H.E. Tuiloma Neroni Slade, as well as representatives of several PIF Member States.

“I commend the Pacific Islands Forum for drafting a regional strategy to address the problems caused by unexploded ordnance in the region,” said Prince Mired following meetings at PIF headquarters in Suva, Fiji earlier today. “By drawing upon the experience of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, affected States in the Pacific can benefit greatly in overcoming the challenges posed by all explosive remnants of war.”

Several Member States of the Pacific Islands Forum are affected by unexploded ordnance and abandoned explosive ordnance from the Second World War, including Palau which has leveraged its participation in the Convention to acquire assistance in addressing related problems. To date, 12 of the 16 Member States of the Pacific Islands Forum have ratified or acceded to the Convention.

Thursday, August 4, 2011
Presenting to the Northeastern University Dialogue!

Presenting to the Northeastern University Dialogue!

Working at the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining

My work at the GICHD is to work for the ISU (Implementation Support Unit) to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention.

The Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction is the cornerstone of the international effort to end the suffering and casualties caused by anti-personnel (AP) mines. The Convention was adopted on 18 September 1997 and it entered into force on 1 March 1999. As of 1 September 2008, 156 states had joined the Convention.

The Convention provides a framework for mine action, seeking both to end existing suffering and to prevent future suffering. The Convention bans the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel mines. In addition, states that accede to the Convention accept that they will destroy both stockpiled and emplaced anti-personnel mines and assist the victims of mines.

This was just a little background information on what the Convention is and what the work I am doing here is all about.